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We are committed to providing unsurpassed customer service. Our skilled laboratory staff ensure credible and reliable analysis.

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OFFICE HOURS

Monday – Friday 8:00 – 5:00
Saturday 8:00 – 2:00
Sunday Closed

954.541.3705

Welcome to ASAP Lab

We strive to provide the highest quality toxicology services in the industry, centered around high customer care. We provide accurate measurable results to allow you to make informed decisions for your patients. We have designed our services around your needs to provide quick, actionable results. With a vast array of services available we can assist with addiction treatment and identification of pathogens for treatment.

LAB SERVICES WE PROVIDE:

We fulfill a broad range of lab services and drug testing requirements:

TESTING

We fulfill a broad range of lab services and drug testing requirements:

Limit workplace liability and employee costs. Ideal for nursing/physician workplace testing. Well-suited for treatment admittance and monitoring. Determine compliance of pain medication patient. Fast turn-around time from receipt of specimen (48 hours, 2 negative, 72 hours positive). Easy to interpret drug and alcohol toxicology reports. Simply locate, view, print and save donor results. Access monthly reports, drug statistics, and more. Examine donor reports and save them securely within the system.

Most people take prescription medications responsibly; however, an estimated 48 million people have used prescription drugs for non-medical reasons. This represents approximately 20% of the U.S. population. The liability issue is tremendous and may damage the lives of employees or patients, your facility’s reputation, and revenue.
Now your agency has the opportunity to choose a new testing option from ASAP Lab Corp. The solution is Comprehensive Drug Testing, detecting a wide-range of prescriptions, illicit drugs and alcohol in urine.

A prescription drug (also prescription medication or prescription medicine) is a licensed medicine that is regulated by legislation to require a medical prescription before it can be obtained. The term is used to distinguish it from over-the-counter drugs that can be obtained without a prescription. Different jurisdictions have different definitions of what constitutes a prescription drug. “Rx” is often used as a short form for prescription drug in North America. It is an abbreviation for the Latin “recipe”, an imperative form of “recipere”, meaning “take”. Prescription drugs are often dispensed together with a monograph (in Europe, a Patient Information Leaflet or PIL) that gives detailed information about the drug.

In the United States, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act defines what requires a prescription. In general, prescription drugs are authorized by veterinarians, dentists, optometrists, medical practitioners and advanced practice nurses. In general, it is required that an MD, DO, PA, OD, DPM, NMD, ND, DVM, DDS, or DMD, some psychologists (see medical psychology), clinical pharmacists, nurse practitioners, and other APRNs write the prescription. Basic-level registered nurses, medical assistants, emergency medical technicians, most psychologists and social workers do not have the authority to prescribe drugs.

Congress enacted the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) was enacted into law in 1970. The CSA is the federal U.S. drug policy under which the manufacture, importation, possession, use and distribution of certain substances is regulated. The legislation created five Schedules (classifications), with varying qualifications for a substance to be included in each. The safety and effectiveness of prescription drugs in the US is regulated by the federal Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is charged with implementing this law. The package insert for a prescription drug contains information about the intended effect of the drug and how it works in the body. It also contains information about side effects, how a patient should take the drug, and cautions for its use, including warnings about allergies.

As a general rule, over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are used to treat conditions not necessarily requiring care from a healthcare professional and have been proven to meet higher safety standards for self-medication by patients. Often a lower strength of a drug will be approved for OTC use, whereas higher strengths require a prescription to be obtained; a notable case is ibuprofen, which has been widely available as an OTC pain killer since the mid-1980s but is still available by prescription in doses up to four times the OTC dose for use in cases of severe pain not adequately controlled by the lower, OTC strength.

The EtG test is a urine based laboratory test that detects the metabolites of alcohol (ethyl glucuronide) in human urine. The body processes alcohol very rapidly, usually at a rate of 1 drink per hour. The EtG test can detect alcohol in urine up to 80 hours after consumption. This is a very useful tool for a zero tolerance policy on alcohol consumption.

UA Labs processes hundreds of urine specimens each week for many clients. A variety of drug panel options are available to your agency to meet your specific needs.

Urine Screening Methodology

In order to determine if a urine specimen is negative or positive for drugs of abuse, all specimens are initially screened by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) procedure. Specimens that yield an EIA response below the specified cut-off are reported with a specific level. Any specimen that shows an EIA response at or above the specified cut-off is considered “presumptive positive” for a particular drug or drug class. Based on your agency’s account, presumptive positive specimens may be confirmed by a second method prior to reporting positive results.

DRUGS OF ABUSE EIA Cut-off
Amphetamine 500 ng/mL
Barbiturates 200 ng/mL
Benzodiazepines 200 ng/mL
Buprenorphine 5 ng/mL
Cocaine Metabolite 100 ng/mL
Ecstasy 500 ng/mL
Ethanol 100 ng/mL
EtG 500 ng/mL
Methadone 250 ng/mL
Methamphetamines 500 ng/mL
Opiates 300 ng/mL
Oxycodone 100 ng/mL
Phencyclidine 25 ng/mL
Propoxyphene 200 ng/mL
THC (cannabinoids) 50 ng/mL

Urinalysis Adulteration/Specimen Validity Examination

UA Labs Standard Operating Procedures require that each urine specimen be examined for signs of adulteration. This examination includes the following:

  • Physical Examination: Color, excessive foaming, excess sediments, or unusual odor are noted. If adulteration is suspected, this is noted on the final report.
  • Analytical Examination: pH, creatinine, oxidents and specific gravity are run to aid in determining specimen validity or possible adulteration.

One of drug users’ most effective resources in their attempts to thwart detection through drug testing is dilution of their urine specimens through excess fluid consumption. By consumption of excess water (or other fluids) over a short period of time the urine quickly becomes highly dilute.

Urine Dilution by excess Water Consumption

Individuals being drug-tested and those responsible for urine testing programs are aware that specimens submitted for testing are vulnerable to adulteration (tampering). Although collection procedures are in place to ensure specimen integrity, donors have demonstrated ingenuity in their efforts to defeat the testing process. Possible methods of avoiding drug-use detection include the addition of adulterants to the specimen, the substitution of someone else’s urine and specimen dilution. Both specimen adulteration and specimen substitution are difficult to accomplish during an observed collection. The presence of adulterants in a urine specimen has the same implications as the presence of drugs. As a result, the most common way to mask drug use is by “internal” dilution (Flushing). This is done by excessive water consumption, and/or taking diuretics such as herbal teas.

Creatinine as an Indicator of Normal vs. Abnormal Urine Specimens

Creatinine is a naturally eliminated in the urine at a relatively stable rate. Therefore, the urine creatinine level indicates the urine concentration. Most normal urine samples will have a creatinine value between 20-350 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). A specimen with a urine creatinine level less than 20 mg/dL is considered “dilute”. Less than 2% of people normally produce a urine sample with a creatinine level under 20 mg/dL. Among those urine samples submitted for employment related drug testing, about 2% (slightly higher than normal) are dilute. Finally, 8% of those urine specimens submitted for court-directed drug tests have a creatinine level under 20 mg/dL.

Drugs are present in the urine in proportion to the urine concentration. When the urine is less concentrated, there is a lower concentration of drugs. When the urine is too dilute, a negative result does not assure non-drug use. We recommend that negative drug test results be disqualified when the specimen has a creatinine level less than 20 mg/dL. Conversely, a positive result on a dilute specimen would not be disqualified, because this indicates that the drug was in such high concentrations that it was detected even with a low urine concentration.

The most common way for a donor to produce a urine specimen with a creatinine level below 20 mg/dL is to drink large quantities of liquid and/or take diuretics prior to providing a specimen. Commercially available products that are marketed as aids in “beating the drug detection system,” such as Clean-Free™, SafeTest™, Naturally Clean Herbal Tea™ and Goldenseal™, can be effective because they contain natural diuretics and encourage additional liquid consumption.

Some donors deliberately drink large quantities of fluids for medical reasons or because they think it is a healthy habit. If a donor consistently provides a dilute specimen they should be reminded that it is their responsibility to provide a specimen suitable for testing and failure to do so might be considered “Refusal to Test”. They should reduce their liquid consumption and limit their use of caffeine and herbal teas. Most people will comply unless they are attempting to mask their drug use.

The best way to minimize the percentage of dilute urine specimens is to use a random collection program. Unannounced specimen collection presents the donor with little time to prepare. Another good practice is to get a first morning “void” if possible, as this specimen often is more concentrated. People who dilute their urine by drinking large amounts of liquids cannot continue this practice indefinitely.

Kava is native to the islands of the South Pacific and is a member of the pepper family. Kava kava (Piper methysticum) has been used as a ceremonial drink in the Pacific Islands for hundreds of years. It has been reported to have an effect similar to an alcoholic drink.

Kava is native to the islands of the South Pacific and is a member of the pepper family.Kava kava (Piper methysticum) has been used as a ceremonial drink in the Pacific Islands for hundreds of years. It has been reported to have an effect similar to an alcoholic drink.The main active components in kava root are called kavalactones. Specific types of kavalactones include dihydrokavain, methysticin, kavain, dihydromethysticin, dihydrokawain, yangonin and desmethoxyyangonin.The roots are chewed or ground into a pulp and added to cold water. The resulting thick brew, which has been compared to the social equivalent of wine in France, is offered to guests and dignitaries visiting the Pacific Islands.

Medical literature sometimes claims kava has a “potential for addiction” because “it produces mild euphoria and relaxation”. The effects of a kava drink vary widely with the particular selection of kava plant(s) and amount. A potent drink results in a faster onset with a lack of stimulation; the user’s eyes become more sensitive, the person soon becomes somnolent and then has deep, dreamless sleep within 30 minutes. Sleep is often restful and pronounced periods of sleepiness correlate to the amount and potency of kava consumed. Kava drinkers are often perceived as having lazy days after consumption of kava the night before, which can be expected as many active kavalactones have half lives of approximately 9 hours.

Side effects include indigestion, mouth numbness, skin rash, headache, drowsiness and visual disturbances. Chronic or heavy use of kava has linked to pulmonary hypertension, skin scaling, loss of muscle control, kidney damage, and blood abnormalities.

Kratom is another name for the leaves of the mitragyna speciosa tree, which look like large, smooth, oval mint leaves. The effect of the drug mimics that of opiates, ranging from sedation to pain reduction to intense euphoria.

Gabapentin is GABA (gamma-amino butyric acid) analogue. The drug was used primarily to treat epilepsy, but current usage includes pain management and treatment of major depressive disorder. This medication is also used in combination with intravenous flumazenil in Prometa Treatment Protocol for alcohol, cocaine or methamphetamines addiction. Additionally, Gabapentin may also ease withdrawal symptoms in patients dependent on benzodiazepines or some opioid painkillers such as heroin, morphine or oxycodone.

Side effects that are more common in children but may occur in anyone:

  • Uncontrollable eye movements or blurred vision
  • Aggressive behavior, anxiety, depression
  • Problems concentrating
  • Mood swings or overreacting; being too emotional
  • Restlessness, suspiciousness
  • Having a false sense of security

In some patients the drug may cause delusions or dementia. Lack of strength, lower back or side pain, swelling of the extremities and flu-like symptoms are not uncommon.

As a general rule, over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are used to treat conditions not necessarily requiring care from a healthcare professional and have been proven to meet higher safety standards for self-medication by patients. Often a lower strength of a drug will be approved for OTC use, whereas higher strengths require a prescription to be obtained; a notable case is ibuprofen, which has been widely available as an OTC pain killer since the mid-1980s but is still available by prescription in doses up to four times the OTC dose for use in cases of severe pain not adequately controlled by the lower, OTC strength.

In the United States, the term “prescription drug” is most commonly used, but they are also called Rx-only drugs or legend drugs, after the Federal and State laws that mandate that all such drugs bear a “legend” prohibiting sale without a prescription; though more complex legends have been used, on most original drug packaging today the legend simply states “Rx only”.

PCR is a method widely used in molecular biology. It is a fast and inexpensive technique to amplify segments of DNA to rapidly identify a pathogen for quick treatment. We can help identify pathogens for sexually transmitted infections, gastrointestinal issues, respiratory health, urinary tract infections, women’s health, and wound health.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

In this age of uncertainty, it’s nice to know there is a reputable lab you can trust.

“ASAP has made my transition to lab testing seamless and smooth. They guided me through the entire process.”

Luis

“ASAP Lab has been a blessing in my life, the turn round time for resulting was exactly what they told me. The ease of inputting the clients into their software program saves my techs so much time.”

Paul L.

“ASAP Lab has been instrumental in providing us quick accurate results. They are very informative and willing to answer any questions we have as a new facility.”

Samantha, Fort Lauderdale, FL

“ASAP Lab’s speedy results help us to hold our treatment center clients accountable.”

Robert, Ft Lauderdale, FL

Get in Touch

ASAP Lab can be reached during normal business hours by phone at 954.541.3705

If you have a medical emergency, please dial 911.

If you have questions about our services, accepted forms of insurance, or our facility please feel free to contact us during normal business hours by phone or use the form below and we will respond within one business day.